Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-1979

Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-1979 Review

Opening with David Mancuso’s seminal “Love Saves the Day” Valentine’s party, Tim Lawrence tells the definitive story of American dance music culture in the 1970s—from its subterranean roots in NoHo and Hell’s Kitchen to its gaudy blossoming in midtown Manhattan to its wildfire transmission through America’s suburbs and urban hotspots such as Chicago, Boston, San Francisco, Los Angeles, Newark, and Miami.Tales of nocturnal journeys, radical music making, and polymorphous sexuality flow through the arteries of Love Saves the Day like hot liquid vinyl. They are interspersed with a detailed examination of the era’s most powerful djs, the venues in which they played, and the records they loved to spin—as well as the labels, musicians, vocalists, producers, remixers, party promoters, journalists, and dance crowds that fueled dance music’s tireless engine.

Love Saves the Day includes material from over three hundred original interviews with the scene's most influential players, including David Mancuso, Nicky Siano, Tom Moulton, Loleatta Holloway, Giorgio Moroder, Francis Grasso, Frankie Knuckles, and Earl Young. It incorporates more than twenty special dj discographies—listing the favorite records of the most important spinners of the disco decade—and a more general discography cataloging some six hundred releases. Love Saves the Day also contains a unique collection of more than seventy rare photos.

Title:Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-1979

Enjoy the book review !

    Love Saves the Day: A History of American Dance Music Culture, 1970-1979 Reviews

  • Tina

    As a young club kid going out at the Paradise Garage during the summer of 1986 I didn't care two hoots about the deep background of Disco or house or Garage music movement. All I cared about was the m...

  • Michelle Mccrary

    As a child of four to the floor and an unabashed dance music lover, this book covered a lot of territory about the roots dance culture my younger knees loved so much. If you're not a real dance music ...

  • Bob

    This is a 500-page history of dance music by an Englishman, mainly about New York in the 70s, with particular emphasis on the DJs and where they played, interestingly structured in 10 chapters, one pe...

  • Zeke

    Detailed, but readable count of the origination of NY Disco. Proves that Disco was indeed an organic phenomenon with roots in Motown & Philly soul and underground dance clubs--not a deviant musical ab...

  • Luis

    Really fantastic chronicle of the rise of nightclub culture and the "disco" sound. Disco in quotes because, as this book explains, the sound is much more than a 4/4, strings and cheesy hooks. Commenda...

  • Owen Daniel

    An essential disco anthropology for anyone who wants to learn more about the original 'back in the day' at Paradise Garage, The Loft, Studio 54 et al. Features the origins of DJ and club culture and t...

  • Alexey

    A bit long-winded for my interest in music of the period. Too much ends up being an encyclopedic digest of period publications. Thanks, Tim , for the musical digest though - to get an idea of the less...

  • Jonathan Shulman

    Long AF but a great history of disco music. Worth reading for the playlists alone....

  • Franz Schuier

    Must read for every historically interested dance music lover....

  • Phil Wildcroft

    A fantastic and engrossing dive into (mostly) New York 1970s club culture....