My Almost Certainly Real Imaginary Jesus

My Almost Certainly Real Imaginary Jesus Review

Kelly Barth, like many American kids, went to Sunday school, sang songs about Zaccheas, and was tucked in with bedtime prayers. A typical Christian kid, that is, until she developed a searingly deep crush on another little girl playing afterhours in church, and more importantly, until Jesus—a tiny, imaginary Jesus, one that stays “safely tucked behind the baseboard or the petals of a peony”—became her invisible friend and constant companion.

Heartbreakingly honest and hilarious, My Almost Certainly Real Imaginary Jesus shows just how easy it can be to fall headlong into fundamentalism, venturing into the very heart of enemy territory and the church’s false promises of altar calls and sexual cures. In the spirit of Anne Lamott’s Traveling Mercies, this debut memoir is plainspoken, speaking with candor and insight. Barth particularly addresses the disconnect between the radical and very human Jesus of history and the church’s supernatural savior. She asks the question to all in the closet—both closet Christians and closet homosexuals: Which is more difficult, admitting to being Christian or admitting to being gay?

An answer is found in her own hard-won journey, a hopeful answer that is an “attempt to leave a record of the early signs of the turning and softening of a collective heart.” Giving voice to many who have searched for sanctuary in a church that has largely rejected them, this story pauses at the threshold of one of a growing number of churches which, in opening the door to her and other homosexuals, welcome Jesus back inside as well.

Title:My Almost Certainly Real Imaginary Jesus
Edition Language:English

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    My Almost Certainly Real Imaginary Jesus Reviews

  • Cindy

    I went to church yesterday. Not in the literal, time honored sense, but I finished a book I've been reading and felt as if I had been to church. The book is ironically named My Almost Certainly Real I...

  • Edward Sullivan

    An honest, interesting, and frequently humorous memoir by a gay woman from a fundamentalist background coming to terms with her Christian faith. ...

  • Michael

    A review of mine, published in the Missoula Independent: Fundamentalist religion and homosexuality have never been on especially good terms. In Kelly Barth's debut memoir, My Almost Certainly Real Ima...

  • David Veazey

    I enjoyed reading this memoir by a woman I am privileged to know, who grew up in Raytown, Missouri, where I now live and went, among others, to where I went to church at Broadway Baptist and Crossroad...

  • Tara

    A little slow-moving at times, but well-worth a read. Ms. Barth's honesty is incredible. A beautiful story of finding love and finding faith and combining the two, whether judged for it or not. I was ...

  • Will

    An illuminating and rewarding read for straight and gay Christians alike, this engagingly powerful memoir tells the story of a lesbian Christian's journey through fundamentalism to a place where even ...

  • Gretchen

    Funny in an Anne Lamott sort of way, and poignant throughout. Proof that coming out is not for sissies....

  • Cara Orban

    I knew that I would find this book interesting, but I had no idea how much it would resonate with me. Young people often struggle with self-loathing and become expert shape-shifters. We buy into false...

  • Kevin

    There are many reasons I draw a heart around this book, not the least of which is the similarities of the author's journey to mine: Being gay and growing up in a compulsorily religious family, Fundame...

  • Kari Hansen

    I especially found the first part of this book funny- laugh out loud funny in spots. Her struggles with being lesbian and Christian are depicted with both humor and poignancy. My heart was warmed with...