The Natural Child: Parenting from the Heart

The Natural Child: Parenting from the Heart Review



The Natural Child is the instruction manual that should have come with your child.
Derek Markham, ecoBrain


The Natural Child makes a compelling case for a return to attachment parenting, a child-rearing approach that has come naturally for parents throughout most of human history. In this insightful guide, parenting specialist Jan Hunt links together attachment parenting principles with child advocacy and homeschooling philosophies, offering a consistent approach to raising a loving, trusting, and confident child. The Natural Child dispels the myths of "tough love," building baby's self-reliance by ignoring its cries, and the necessity of spanking to enforce discipline. Instead, the book explains the value of extended breast-feeding, family co-sleeping, and minimal child-parent separation.

Homeschooling, like attachment parenting, nurtures feelings of self-worth, confidence, and trust. The author draws on respected leaders of the homeschool movement such as John Taylor Gatto and John Holt, guiding the reader through homeschool approaches that support attachment parenting principles.

Being an ally to children is spontaneous for caring adults, but intervening on behalf of a child can be awkward and surrounded by social taboo. The Natural Child shows how to stand up for a child's rights effectively and sensitively in many difficult situations.

The role of caring adults, points out Hunt, is not to give children "lessons in life"–but to employ a variation of The Golden Rule, and treat children as we would like to have been treated in childhhood.

Jan Hunt is the Director of The Natural Child Project, Coordinator of the Canadian Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children in British Columbia, and on the Board of Directors for Attachment Parenting International. She lives in Victoria, British Columbia.

 

Title:The Natural Child: Parenting from the Heart
Edition Language:English

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    The Natural Child: Parenting from the Heart Reviews

  • Chelsea

    I loved this book. It is very much written with an attachment\empathetic parenting viewpoint so if you are not into that you will more than likely not agree with everything she says. The book is a com...

  • John Cass

    I read this book on 'attachment parenting' a number of years ago. The book starts out really well by providing a refreshing alternative to what many would consider mainstream norms for raising childre...

  • Lesly

    Read with caution and common sense too. I like to read the two extremes in parenting approaches: Baby Wise from Gary Ezzo is in one extreme and this one is in the other extreme in my opinion. It has g...

  • Amber

    Man, what a disappointment. I'm bummed that this is the first book I read as an expectant mom. It's a lot of preaching and judgement about how to raise your kids with really nothing to back it up. It'...

  • Amy

    I found so much that I agreed with in this book - but a lack of practical ways to apply this to my life with a toddler and now preschooler. - holy crap I have a preschooler!...

  • Whole And

    A wonderful gentle yet firm guide to natural, attachment, heartfelt parenting. Covering all the principles in parenting, from co-sleeping to loving discipline, nurturing a love of learning, teaching y...

  • Kris

    There were things I loved about this book. The idea that children are people and should be treated with respect and trust. I consider myself to be an attachment parent, and I agreed with a lot of it. ...

  • Melissa Matthewson

    A pretty good parenting book. I got some good ideas from it. Basically reaffirms the whole concept behind attachment parenting, emphasizing prolonged breastfeeding, co-sleeping and no separation. I ge...

  • Kate Hyde

    This book is a collection of articles that the author has written for various magazines (several of the articles can be found online at www.naturalchild.org). Much of what I read was familiar to me be...

  • Phaedra

    Really just a compilation of articles written by the author for various outlets. I often found myself double checking to make sure that I hadn't accidentally reread a section: the book becomes redunda...