The Owl, the Raven, and the Dove: The Religious Meaning of the Grimms' Magic Fairy Tales

The Owl, the Raven, and the Dove: The Religious Meaning of the Grimms' Magic Fairy Tales Review

The fairy tales collected by the brothers Grimm are among the best known and most widely-read stories in western literature. In recent years commentators such as Bruno Bettelheim have, usually from a psychological perspective, pondered the underlying meaning of the stories, why children are so enthralled by them, and what effect they have on the the best-known tales (Hansel and Gretel, Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Snow White, and Sleeping Beauty) and shows that the Grimms saw them as Christian fables. Murphy examines the arguments of previous interpreters of the tales, and demonstrates how they missed the Grimms' intention. His own readings of the five so-called "magical" tales reveal them as the beautiful and inspiring "documents of faith" that the Grimms meant them to be.
Offering an entirely new perspective on these often-analyzed tales, Murphy's book will appeal to those concerned with the moral and religious education of children, to students and scholars of folk literature and children's literature, and to the many general readers who are captivated by fairy tales and their meanings.

Title:The Owl, the Raven, and the Dove: The Religious Meaning of the Grimms' Magic Fairy Tales
Edition Language:English

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    The Owl, the Raven, and the Dove: The Religious Meaning of the Grimms' Magic Fairy Tales Reviews

  • Sherwood Smith

    Father Murphy was a guest at Mythcon. His talk on the Heliand and the remarkable churches of Northern Europe, with their dragon roofs, was so compelling I had to get this book.I was glad I did. I foun...

  • Rosamund Hodge

    Read this for the upcoming Mythcon. It compares the Brothers Grimm version of several major fairytales to other versions (esp. Perrault), and argues that the Grimms emphasized Classical, German, and C...

  • Thomas

    Murphy, a Jesuit priest and Professor of German at Georgetown, provides a fascinating, Christian-themed look at the Grimms' tales,I read Bruno Bettleheim in college and appreciated how he made the ana...

  • Sarah Schantz

    Last night, I sifted through my ever-growing stack of "to read" books, and came across this fairly new addition to the pile. Thinking, I'd just skim through it, then pick a work of fiction (since it i...

  • Brandon

    There are some gems buried within this, but overall treatment was superficial. Would love to have had more presentation regarding pre-christian philosophy, and discussion of the unwitting role the Gri...

  • Mary Catelli

    The Brothers Grimm, as is well known, did not collect fairy tales with the rigor of a modern folklorist. Many of their tellers were middle-class, not peasantry, and of Hugenot and so French descent. F...

  • Catherine

    This is a delightful book where the author examines the most famous of the Brother's Grimm fairy tales. He looks at the role of fable and faith for the Brothers, and the world in which they lived. Mur...

  • Lorri

    I picked this up hoping to learn more about the Grimm fairy tales. The book does not seem to be geared for a casual reader like me but more for fairy tale scholars. Thus I found the first section incr...

  • April Cordon

    This book was very well done. It looks into the religious and classical symbolism that was purposefully woven into a handful of fairy tales. I highly recommend it to anyone who has more than a passing...

  • Mimi

    An interesting examination of the Christian imagery in the Grimm fairy tales, including information about Willhelm Grimm's religious views, and of Germanic tales in general. Fascinating and probably o...