The Zimmermann Telegram

The Zimmermann Telegram Review

The Proud Tower, the Pulitzer Prize–winning The Guns of August, and The Zimmermann Telegram comprise Barbara W. Tuchman’s classic histories of the First World War era
 
In January 1917, the war in Europe was, at best, a tragic standoff. Britain knew that all was lost unless the United States joined the war, but President Wilson was unshakable in his neutrality. At just this moment, a crack team of British decoders in a quiet office known as Room 40 intercepted a document that would change history. The Zimmermann telegram was a top-secret message to the president of Mexico, inviting him to join Germany and Japan in an invasion of the United States. How Britain managed to inform the American government without revealing that the German codes had been broken makes for an incredible story of espionage and intrigue as only Barbara W. Tuchman could tell it.
 
Praise for The Zimmermann Telegram
 
“A true, lucid thriller . . . a tremendous tale of hushed and unhushed uproars in the linked fields of war and diplomacy . . . Tuchman makes the most of it with a creative writer’s sense of drama and a scholar’s obeisance to the evidence.”The New York Times
 
“The tale has most of the ingredients of an Eric Ambler spy thriller.”Saturday Review

Title:The Zimmermann Telegram
Edition Language:English

Enjoy the book review !

    The Zimmermann Telegram Reviews

  • Trevor

    There is something very strange about the First World War. I mean, surely there must be something I previously knew about it that must be true.The $64,000 question is: what event brought the United St...

  • Brian DiMattia

    I recently criticized a book on this site for trying to tell a history by jumping around, and said that it takes a very good writer to make that work. Barbara Tuchman has that skill. She tells a very ...

  • David

    I listened to this book because I have kind of an interest in cryptography and its historical impact. The Zimmerman Telegram is ostensibly about the famous telegram that was the final straw that broug...

  • Bettie

    As it was sent from Washington to Mexico Complete decryption and translation4* A Distant Mirror: The Calamitous 14th Century 3* The Proud Tower: A Portrait of the World Before the War 1890-1914 CR The...

  • Grumpus

    I thought that lots of information--stuff I didn't know, would translate into an interesting read. While I learned a lot, the flow was never compelling to me like other good books that "bring you ther...

  • Rae

    I am fascinated by the fact that "history" often happens because of seemingly small, uneventful, accidental or coincidental events. Tuchman, one of my favorite historian/authors, tells the story of th...

  • Rebecca Wilson

    This book shocked me, for a few different reasons:1. I had NO idea that a decoded telegram was the thing that finally drove the U.S. to join the allies in WWI.2. I had no idea that Germany had propose...

  • Evan Leach

    ”In itself, the Zimmerman telegram was only a pebble on the long road of history. But a pebble can kill a Goliath, and this one killed the American illusion that we could go about our business happi...

  • Clif Hostetler

    This is the history of the political and diplomatic events that caused the United States to enter World War I. Most of us have a vague recollection from our school text books that the sinking of the L...

  • aPriL does feral sometimes

    Barbara Tuchman is an unbelievably good writer of history, and it appears her research is impeccable. The arguments, as always, seem to be about her conclusions (per some of her peers when I googled h...