Enemy of All Mankind: A True Story of Piracy, Power, and History's First Global Manhunt

Enemy of All Mankind: A True Story of Piracy, Power, and History's First Global Manhunt Review

The New York Times bestselling author of Ghost Map and How We Got to Now returns with the story of a pirate who changed the world

Most confrontations, viewed from the wide angle of history, are minor disputes, sparks that quickly die out. But every now and then, someone strikes a match that lights up the whole planet.

Henry Every was the seventeenth century's most notorious pirate. The press published wildly popular--and wildly inaccurate--reports of his nefarious adventures. The British government offered enormous bounties for his capture, alive or (preferably) dead. But Steven Johnson argues that Every's most lasting legacy was his inadvertent triggering of a major shift in the global economy. Enemy of All Mankind focuses on one key event--the attack on an Indian treasure ship by Every and his crew--and its surprising repercussions across time and space. It's the gripping tale one of the most lucrative crimes in history, the first international manhunt, and the trial of the seventeenth century.

Johnson uses the extraordinary story of Henry Every and his crimes to explore the emergence of the East India Company, the British Empire, and the modern global marketplace: a densely interconnected planet ruled by nations and corporations. How did this unlikely pirate and his notorious crime end up playing a key role in the birth of multinational capitalism? In the same mode as Johnson's classic non-fiction historical thriller The Ghost Map, Enemy of All Mankind deftly traces the path from a single struck match to a global conflagration.

Title:Enemy of All Mankind: A True Story of Piracy, Power, and History's First Global Manhunt

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    Enemy of All Mankind: A True Story of Piracy, Power, and History's First Global Manhunt Reviews

  • Madeline

    I really enjoyed reading Johnson's Ghost Map for my global health course in university, and his writing shines again in his newest work!In his author note, Johnson links this work with Ghost Map, noti...

  • Stacie C

    Bringing to life the story of a notorious pirate to a modern audience isn’t an easy task. We’re too used to the comfort of easy travel, the mythos of pirates and the commercialized imagery produce...

  • Al

    The subtitle may be true, but as is often the case, the content doesn't quite live up to the billing. The story is nominally about Henry Every, one of the major players of the piratical age. He's not...

  • Porter Broyles

    This book possibly deserves more than 3 stars, but it didn't grab me the way it I was hoping. It's well written and interesting....

  • Geoff

    I expected a fun red and a huge does of historical thoughtfulness and thread-connecting and that's exactly what Johnson delivered. He used a shockingly violent English Pirate attack on a Mughal Indian...

  • Joe M

    4 swashbuckling staaarrrs! ...

  • jeremy

    understanding that egalitarian ethos is essential to understanding why pirates like henry every were so popular at home. they were not just charismatic rogues, pursuing a life of adventure at sea. ...

  • Ben

    There is too much exaggeration and too many hypotheticals for my taste. This could be an interesting story, but not with the little hard information we seem to have available. Surprisingly, the fictio...

  • Amy Rae

    Did I love it because it was actually good, or did I love it because I waited months for it (I think I preordered it in December or January?) and then received it in the middle of a fucking pandemic a...

  • Larry

    Johnson does a great deal with a little (scattered pieces of evidence with missing material) to sketch the great accomplishment of a largely unknown pirate—maybe the greatest single exploit ever car...