Why We're Wrong About Nearly Everything: A Theory of Human Misunderstanding

Why We're Wrong About Nearly Everything: A Theory of Human Misunderstanding Review

A leading social researcher explains why humans so consistently misunderstand the outside world
How often are women harassed? What percentage of the population are immigrants? How bad is unemployment? These questions are important, but most of us get the answers wrong. Research shows that people often wildly misunderstand the state of the world, regardless of age, sex, or education. And though the internet brings us unprecedented access to information, there's little evidence we're any better informed because of it.
We may blame cognitive bias or fake news, but neither tells the complete story. In Why We're Wrong About Nearly Everything, Bobby Duffy draws on his research into public perception across more than forty countries, offering a sweeping account of the stubborn problem of human delusion: how society breeds it, why it will never go away, and what our misperceptions say about what we really believe.
We won't always know the facts, but they still matter. Why We're Wrong About Nearly Everything is mandatory reading for anyone interested making humankind a little bit smarter.

Title:Why We're Wrong About Nearly Everything: A Theory of Human Misunderstanding

Enjoy the book review !

    Why We're Wrong About Nearly Everything: A Theory of Human Misunderstanding Reviews

  • Shelly

    This is an immensely interesting book steeped in research and anecdotal information. Cognitive bias and heuristics shape our perceptions much more than we are aware. Why We're Wrong About Nearly Every...

  • Ryan Boissonneault

    “The human understanding when it has once adopted an opinion draws all things else to support and agree with it. And though there be a greater number and weight of instances to be found on the other...

  • Doreen McDonald

    Meh. Picked up this book because of a recommendation in a magazine (don’t remember which one). Maybe because I listened to it, maybe because I’ve already read Thinking Fast and Slow a couple times...

  • Tracey Jepsen

    Interesting insight, but very biased. I would have given this a higher rating if the information had been presented in a neutral manner....

  • June

    I learned a lot from this book, not only data/anecdata, but also just the reminder that it's good to question what you accept is true. I found myself picking up the book periodically, not reading stra...

  • Heather Bennett

    Why We're Wrong About Nearly Everything is a interesting read. It can be a bit dry in some spots, but it has some unique ideas....

  • Alex Shrugged

    Note: The author seems to be a subject of the United Kingdom, This book attempts to address the mindset of the UK, Europe, the United States, Canada and Australia. It is wide-ranging, but he does a re...

  • Sam

    This is Steven Pinker style positivism bollocks for anyone who wants to see the world with rose colored glasses. I can't beleive shit like this is written today. It affirms what white folks will read ...

  • Courtney

    I recieved a complementary advance copy of this book from netgalley.com for review. This book addresses misconceptions that the public holds about a wide range of different phenomena. I enjoyed its cr...

  • Mikko Arevuo

    A good introduction to biases and delusions in everyday social and political life. The author draws on an impressive variety of empirical research to present his findings. I work in the field of manag...