Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler's Defeat

Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler's Defeat Review

Six gentlemen, one goal: the destruction of Hitler's war machine

In the spring of 1939, a top-secret organization was founded in London: its purpose was to plot the destruction of Hitler's war machine through spectacular acts of sabotage.

The guerrilla campaign that followed was every bit as extraordinary as the six men who directed it. One of them, Cecil Clarke, was a maverick engineer who had spent the 1930s inventing futuristic caravans. Now, his talents were put to more devious use: he built the dirty bomb used to assassinate Hitler's favorite, Reinhard Heydrich. Another, William Fairbairn, was a portly pensioner with an unusual passion: he was the world's leading expert in silent killing, hired to train the guerrillas being parachuted behind enemy lines. Led by dapper Scotsman Colin Gubbins, these men—along with three others—formed a secret inner circle that, aided by a group of formidable ladies, single-handedly changed the course Second World War: a cohort hand-picked by Winston Churchill, whom he called his Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare.

Giles Milton's Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare is a gripping and vivid narrative of adventure and derring-do that is also, perhaps, the last great untold story of the Second World War.

Title:Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler's Defeat
Edition Language:English

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    Churchill's Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler's Defeat Reviews

  • Jill

    If caught this eclectic group of researchers and intelligence spies, a slow painful death was would be their last assignment. There was no book written on the best way to kill, incapacitate, or maim t...

  • K.J. Charles

    An extraordinary story: the impact of saboteurs on WW2, and how much the British establishment fought against them. Reads like fiction. People inventing limpet mines and hedgehog anti submarine missil...

  • Martin

    In dark days that heralded World War Two Britain assembled a collection of people willing to fight in ways that would destroy the enemy and break all the "rules" of polite war.The dangerous inventorGu...

  • Andrew

    This is both a chilling book and a fascinating one. The book depicts the act of sabotage and gorilla warfare as though its an necessity - which at the time it was. However by its very nature (and some...

  • Shelley

    This is a sort of greatest hits of Britain's clandestine guerilla warfare during WWII. The ministry (once it had some legitimacy in the government, that is; there were plenty of people who were oppose...

  • Lauren

    FAN-F$&@ING-TASTIC. I absolutely love history that reads like a novel, and this was a swashbuckling ride from beginning to end. I had no idea just how little I knew about the massive impact that these...

  • Ron

    “The whole art of guerilla warfare lies in striking the enemy where he least expects it and yet where he is most vulnerable.” Colin GubbinsThe best World War Two history I’ve read in years. One ...

  • Steve

    To me this read like an incredible spy novel. However, this was real life. During World War II, British prime minister Winston Churchill organized a top secret spy organization to wreck havoc on Hitle...

  • Daniel Farabaugh

    This was an excellent book that really gives a great account of a lesser known subject of World War II. It does a great job of putting the guerrilla warfare and sabotage in the context of the larger w...

  • Lee Battersby

    Absolutely fascinating insight into the formation, development, and successes of a typically British endeavour: a disparate collection of professional soldiers, backyard garage boffins, Oxbridge Mafia...