The Chaperone

The Chaperone Review

The Chaperone is  a captivating novel about the woman who chaperoned an irreverent Louise Brooks to New York City in 1922 and the summer that would change them both.
 
Only a few years before becoming a famous silent-film star and an icon of her generation, a fifteen-year-old Louise Brooks leaves Wichita, Kansas, to study with the prestigious Denishawn School of Dancing in New York. Much to her annoyance, she is accompanied by a thirty-six-year-old chaperone, who is neither mother nor friend. Cora Carlisle, a complicated but traditional woman with her own reasons for making the trip, has no idea what she’s in for. Young Louise, already stunningly beautiful and sporting her famous black bob with blunt bangs, is known for her arrogance and her lack of respect for convention. Ultimately, the five weeks they spend together will transform their lives forever.
 
For Cora, the city holds the promise of discovery that might answer the question at the core of her being, and even as she does her best to watch over Louise in this strange and bustling place she embarks on a mission of her own. And while what she finds isn’t what she anticipated, she is liberated in a way she could not have imagined. Over the course of Cora’s relationship with Louise, her eyes are opened to the promise of the twentieth century and a new understanding of the possibilities for being fully alive.
 
Drawing on the rich history of the 1920s,’30s, and beyond—from the orphan trains to Prohibition, flappers,  and the onset of the Great Depression to the burgeoning movement for equal rights and new opportunities for women—Laura Moriarty’s The Chaperone illustrates how rapidly everything, from fashion and hemlines to values and attitudes, was changing at this time and what a vast difference it all made for Louise Brooks, Cora Carlisle, and others like them.

Title:The Chaperone
Edition Language:English

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    The Chaperone Reviews

  • Alena

    I really liked so much of this book (including Elizabeth McGovern's excellent narration), but it just went on so long. I felt like it had several false endings, places where I was finished but then it...

  • Sabrina

    When one reads the name of Louise Brooks on the jacket of a book, one assumes that the book will be filled with tales of the glamorous silent movie star who went to seed too fast but remained proud an...

  • Jeanette

    Corsets, yes. Condoms, no. Times are changing in 1922, but repressive attitudes linger. Birth control is for sleazy people. Divorce carries a permanent stigma. Homosexuals are called "sodomites," and ...

  • Melanie

    First off, I am a sucker for historical fiction. I really, really liked this book! Cora Carlisle (the chaperone) is a great character. I felt as though I knew Cora and was completely wrapped up in her...

  • Madeline

    It's the summer of 1922 in Wichita, Kansas, and thirty-six year old Cora Carlisle is bored. Her twin sons are preparing to leave for college, and she doesn't have anything to do with her time except v...

  • Elyse Walters

    Cora Carlisle is a fictionalized character, as 'The Chaperone', in this story to Louise's Brooks who in real life was a film actress and dancer who starred in 17 silent films and 8 sound films before ...

  • Cathrine ??

    4★I would describe this story as a woman’s journey of self-discovery as she is entering a mid-life crisis at the dawn of the twentieth century. A voyage to discover truths about her beginnings whi...

  • Catharine

    I can't recommend this book to any of my friends. SPOILER ALERT: There is a bit of a spoiler in the next paragraph.There are a couple of themes going on in this book. The first is knowing oneself. How...

  • Agatha

    Yuck. Would not recommend this book at all. I would put this book in the category of “I wasted my time [reading it] so you do not have to.” LOL. This book is loosely historical fiction, but then h...

  • Crystal Starr Light

    Bullet Review:Parts 1 and 2: 4 starsPart 3: Negative 80 starsWhat a HORRIBLE HORRIBLE end to an actual decent book with a great message and discussion topic.My recommendation: Don't read past page 285...